As you are probably aware, our contemporary English content is now available through Lexico.com (https://www.lexico.com/en), and our old English dictionary site no longer exists.

As a result of this, this forum is now closed.

The English dictionary community team would like the opportunity to say a huge thanks to all of you who participated by posting questions and helping other community members.
We hope this forum was useful, and that you enjoyed being a part of it.

If you would like to get in touch with any OED-related queries, please write to
[email protected]

And if you would like to contribute suggestions to the OED, please do so by visiting: https://public.oed.com/contribute-to-the-oed/

Thank you very much indeed, and good bye!
The community team

Comments

  • Hello @Ludwa Our dictionaries are descriptive, not prescriptive. When we are defining a word we combine our understanding of how it is used in the language with an analysis of resources such as the Oxford English Corpus. We do not try to influence …
  • Hello @APRAJAN Fowler’s Modern English Usage_ is helpful for queries like this (available on our Premium site). This is what it has to say about commas: https://premium.oxforddictionaries.com/secondary/pocket_fowlers_modern_eng_usage/comma To sep…
  • Hello @gwadding872 Our dictionaries are descriptive, not prescriptive. When we are defining a word we combine our understanding of how it is used in the language with an analysis of resources such as the Oxford English Corpus. We do not try to infl…
  • Hello @denizbbezik When referencing our online dictionary, we recommend you use ‘Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press’, using the date of access if a date is required. Kind regards, The Oxford Dictionaries team
  • Hello @dheerajdhaka You can follow this link to submit a word to our dictionaries. Kind regards, The Oxford Dictionaries team
  • Hi @Ali_IY Here are a couple of blog posts about idioms: https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/06/15/weather-idioms-rain/ https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/01/28/when-in-rome-read-some-place-name-idioms/ And one about proverbs: https://…
  • Hello @eyucel83 We do license our data out through bespoke plans. More information about pricing can be found here: https://developer.oxforddictionaries.com/ Although, I must point out that caching data is only available through licensing plans. …
  • Hi @PJ2018 There are 283,000 entries and 860,000 meanings currently in the OED. This gives a mean average of just over 3 meanings per entry. However, mean average can be a very misleading measure here: there’s a power-law distribution which means …
  • Hello @NadChel I'll use an example with screenshots from the OED to hopefully answer this one for you. If we use ACE, v. as an example, you can see that here both senses 2.a. and 2.b. are transitive verbs and U.S. slang, as the labels appear befor…
  • Hello @akumar694 We have lots of different tips for writing and grammar on our site. Take a look at some of these pages: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/
  • Hello @Antaryamin As this definition includes more than one subject, are generally works here. But please do feel free to get back in touch, should you query any grammar on our sites in future :) Thanks, Charlotte
  • Hi @civitas Unfortunately, we don't publish an archive of Word of the Day words previously used. Sorry! Charlotte
  • Hello @tristandestry. Thank you for pointing this out. Our Editors have looked into it and have now amended the error. However this change may not go live until our next update in June. Thanks again.
  • Hello @Zeesid I believe the correct phrase and spelling would be 'mispronunciation' See our entry here: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/mispronunciation
  • Hello @mgoronsky582 Some grammar conventions explain, for example, that quotation marks (also known as inverted commas in British English) should mark both the beginning and end of the direct speech: ‘That,’ he said, ‘is nonsense.’ In British Eng…
  • Hello @mgoronsky582 In scientific publications, units of measurement are almost never pluralized when abbreviated. Arguably, this should remain true for general use, as well. You should therefore write "lb." The abbreviation "lb&quo…
  • Hello @fcuculo633 A relative clause is a clause that is attached to an antecedent by a relative pronoun such as who, which, or that. E.g. "I don't like the clown that has a big red nose" I wonder if by 'extended relative clause', you are…