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Comments

  • I don't think it's necessary to combine them into one word in this case, since holes don't actually have a colour - a (physical) hole is a space. For example, what would "a yellow hole" mean to you? EDIT: It's not incorrect to combine the…
  • You could try https://oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com. I'm a native speaker of English who, for some reason, developed an interest in definitions of words, grammar, etc., and I find that the Oxford Learner's Dictionary website is sometimes actually …
  • @DavidCrosbie Oh, yes. I agree. I just think 'unwilling' (at least to some people) means something stronger than 'reluctant' - that they will not do the action in question, which makes the "unwilling and hesitant" definition of 'reluctant'…
  • (Quote) If you refresh the page, it'll eventually show it, but here's the quote: "The ruling elite has reacted to this, not just by repression but also by being willing, albeit reluctantly, to contemplate form." (Quote) I must not have e…
  • I think there must be two separate senses of willingness in actual usage: one being intention/volition of action, and one being what one wishes. I found this example: "3.6 A small number of employee members who are currently not making any pay…
  • @DavidCrosbie So, 'willing' and 'unwilling' actually refer to what one wants to do rather than to what one will/won't do by volition? I always thought it was just about volition, one's free will. I've heard them used often in reference to actions th…
  • @DavidCrosbie How can it be exaggerated if it actually happened? I think the point of "literally" here is to make it clear that there is no exaggeration.
  • @DavidCrosbie Hyperbole: exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literally. Nothing in the Trump example has been exaggerated. He literally did say it to a guy wearing a yarmulke.
  • @Ludwa Merriam-Webster has a definition that fits this use (see definition 1b): (Image) I think M-W is generally a better dicitionary for inclusion of more senses. Consult M-W if you don't find a sense in the Oxford dictionary.
  • @MitchMacKaye I don't see hyperbole in these examples. Trump did say that answering a question from a guy wearing yarmulke: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtl5XK7QP38 w Trump's statement was hyperbolic, yes. If you remove "literally": &q…
  • @DavidCrosbie Firstly, thank you very much for replying! I sincerely appreciate it. This has been driving me mental. (Quote) To be clear: you're using 'type' here to mean "a typical example", rather than "a class"? (Quote) Stri…
  • I think it means something like "to crawl in a circular motion from one side of something to another". Like if a baby crawled from one side of a picnic table to the other, or maybe all the way around. Or like if a very, very drunk person w…
  • Racism: prejudice or discrimination against, or other negative treatment of, people because of their race That's it. Negative because of race.
  • It is used in place of another noun that refers to a type of thing already mentioned earlier in the conversation or that it asssumed to be understood. For example, if we were looking at cars and I pointed out a red car and said "That red car i…
  • The meaning in those examples is an extension of the meaning in first, core definition. "Literally" is being used to mean that something did literally happen but that it is also surprising/the speaker is not joking/being ironic. If you rem…