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Comments

  • @lb_c119, I think you've missed the sense of 'widespread' in all three sentences. And I think truly in the second sentence belongs in a different clause; She was exaggerating how far-reaching the problem truly is.
  • This sent me back to two old dictionaries of mine aimed at the 'advanced learner'. Neither is the latest edition, but I don't expect there's much difference in approach. The 1974 edition of the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current Englis…
  • Dasha, this is not Future! The English word will is classed not simply as a verb but as a MODAL VERB. MODAL VERBS * have a different grammar form verbs which are not AUXILIARIES * express attitudes or judgements * approximately reflect MODAL LOGI…
  • This discussion raises two basic questions about dictionary definitions: 1. What range of senses of a word should be identified? 2. How do you communicate communicate them to a reader? And before answering either question, there's the even more ba…
  • Right, I've worked out what the difference is for me... * To be unwilling or reluctant to do something is a state of mind * To refuse to do something is to communicate that state of mind — typically with words, but possibly with a gesture,
  • Your link leads to a page that is unavailable. (Quote) On the contrary, it suggests that in their mind there is no possibility that they might actually do it. (Though it might turn out that they were mistaken, that unforeseen circumstances forced …
  • @irmantasgn (Quote) This is grammatical but the meaning is very strange indeed. It only makes sense in this context: He was told that he must not clean his room. On Monday he cleaned his room, so he wasn't allowed to go out. On Tuesday he clea…
  • @MitchMacKaye (Quote) No. The definition is (Quote) The second line makes all the difference. (Quote) No, not as I understand the words willing and reluctant. (Quote) This brings out the importance of /with infinitive/. Reluctant to refers forw…
  • @tm_adams476 (Quote) I totally disagree. Language is a communicative transaction between two parties. Neither party can appeal to the equivalent of a law court. (Quote) They're not. But I see why the layout misled you. The only synonyms offered…
  • @vjamal915, the title is almost sixty years old. For the first forty-one years it was titled the Oxford Advanced Lerarner's Dictionary of Current English or OALDCE. It established such a dominance in its chosen market that the publishers felt they d…
  • @vjamal915, as a teacher of English language, a student of English language teaching, a trainer of English language teachers, an English language teaching consultant and an observer from retirement, I can report from these decades of experience that…
  • @jhylands2 * The spelling thing's can only represent 'of thing' — which means nothing at all. * Certainly means 'I have no doubt that...'. What this signifies must depend on the context. We can't tell why the speaker chooses to say this when we can…
  • @SB_19, look at the example sentences from the dictionary linked to this web page (Quote) _ Most these have study with some words that qualify (how you study) or quantify (how much you study) * the study of ... * academic study * formal study * mu…
  • @timperkin9 * The possessive of we is our. * The written possessive of onlookers is onlookers'. (In speech they are identical.) * The possessive of we onlookers is of us onlookers. The noun you want is consternation. There are restrictions on whe…
  • I now see it's not quite so simple. It's true that the pentathlon and the decathlon are events in the sport called athletis _or _track and field. But I was wrong to say the same of this other race — which is a combination of three events from thre…
  • @kzrarkovic, the trialthlon isn't a sport. It's an event. The sport can be called athletics or track and field — both without the. Look at some other sports where a competition is divided into events — swimming, for example, or cycling. I think yo…
  • @composmentis, boyfriends not included is a VERBLESS CLAUSE. Boyfriend's not included is strange because Boyfriend is not included is strange. You would normally have to write Your boyfriend is not included. or A boyfriend is not included. or The b…
  • Gavin, the OED reports how people have used English words over the centuries. That report is the truth — or at least as much truth as the surviving data can reveal. Language changes. My particular interest is in how English grammar has changed. But…
  • The sentence (Quote) was not uttered by Trump. Whoever said or wrote it was using the word literally in an exaggerated sense.
  • (Quote) The hyperbole is the use of the word literally.
  • I couldn't disagree more. The terms descriptive and prescriptive constitute a commonplace in all serious and scientific discussion of lexicography and grammar. They distinguish the scientific from the opinionated, the fact from the shibboleth. Fo…
  • @learner34, the writer chooses to represent lunacy and hatred as a mixture — a single result of the propagation, and a single effect in the way that it prevails. He or she could have chosen to represent lunacy and hatred as two emotions, but didn't.
  • @MitchMacKaye, I don't think it's the word literally that expresses amazement. It's the act of hyperbole.
  • @esiao306, I think you need to be mopre careful with the terms PHRASE and CLAUSE. * Due to the war is a phrase. There is no complexity to it. It's a SIMPLE phrase. Modern grammar books would term it a PREPOSITIONAL PHRASE. * Due to the war, eve…
  • @MitchMacKaye, Semantics makes a distinction between * a TYPE — a SINGLE abstraction * a TOKEN — one of MANY concrete objects or narrowly defined abstractions sharing the CHARACTERISTICS or QUALITIES of the TYPE The concept of being DISTINCTIV…
  • @shaddad443, If I heard or saw a long beard man I would take it to mean 'a man who specialises in long beards'. I would then try to make sense of it — a specialist hairdresser, perhaps. Bearded is one of countless words where NOUN + SUFFIX produces…
  • This has been identified elsewhere as a mistake https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/may-turn-out-not-prove.2806390/
  • Here are the categories of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language. * Personal pronouns * Reflexive pronouns * Possessive pronouns * Reciprocal pronouns * Relative pronouns * Interrogative pronouns * Demonstrative pronouns * Indefinite pron…
  • The word should be violation, @Qmarri
  • What matters, @Live_Liv, is not the LETTER at the start of the word, but the SOUND. The word spelled one is pronounced WUN. So the first sound is W, which is a CONSONANT. So it's a one, not an one.