Comments

  • @Ali_IY, they are different in every way. What makes you think that they at all similar? Look at the top left corner. Click on the word Dictionary and look up the two words
  • What does Robert Vadra mean?
  • @Island_girl, the OED shows a history leading to this use 1b. fig. and in extended use: to fill, occupy. a1886 E. Dickinson Poems (1955) III. 1141 Populate with awe my solitude. a1914 J. P. Bourke Off Bluebush (1915) 156 Thos…
  • @amohamad803, there are two ways to improve the sentence * You are the tallest student that has ever come here. * You are the tallest student ever to come here. Note that we don't say to here.
  • @mgoronsky582, I'm not aware of any conventional use of single quotes in this way. There is a long history of using apostrophes in plurals. Unfortunately there is a body of English users — mostly American I think — who are fiercely opposed to apo…
  • @helenmai, I think the point of the Amazon usage it that the reviewer is awarding stars for the product. A review of a musical is not generally seen as an award. However I think most people would accept There were rave reviews for the new mu…
  • @olipowell, I think the only evidence you should consider is other international marketing campaigns. With any luck, there are not many of these using the word, and they might be willing to explain their choice of spelling.
  • Sam, I think the clearest works are by LR Palmer. Try to have a look at The English Verb https://amazon.co.uk/English-Longman-Linguistics-Library-1988-03-02/dp/B01FJ0FNQQ/ref=sr_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1549568049&sr=1-8&keywords=F…
  • In defence of calling might a PAST form, like to argue from REPORTED SPEECH PRESENT SPEECH 'NOW' EVENT — I say it is PRESENT SPEECH 'THEN' EVENT — I say it was PAST SPEECH 'NOW' EVENT — I said it was PAST SPEECH 'THEN' EVENT — I said it ha…
  • Sam, might have been is a FORM, not a PART OF SPEECH. Yes, might is best described as a MODAL AUXILIARY VERB or, more simply, a MODAL VERB. This is what could be termed a PART OF SPEECH, though I prefer the term WORD CLASS. It's debatable wh…
  • @theodora, my whole point is that as an English speaker I don't feel the slightest hint of oxymoron. I said there's no point is asking why words mean what they mean, because that is my firm conviction. The meaning of a word is the way it is us…
  • Fine, except Car Park AB without the.
  • @oolobayo840, the verbs see, hear, watch and feel can be followed by a 'clause' with a SUBJECT and the verb form BARE INFINITIVE (i.e. without the word to). Since the SUBJECT of bang the car door and drive away is the OBJECT of Ugwu heard we ca…
  • * I've explained what I think is the difference between the fire safety systems and fire safety systems. But this difference disappears when you write something as a title or a headline. We frequently miss out articles in these summarising non-se…
  • @Mertullgu, the question is a test of your understanding of the word although. It isn't just another word for but. We could write The science of geology as we know it today is a relatively young field, but insightful observations of the Earth'…
  • But there is hardly a person on Earth who wouldn't first call to mind Puzo's book or adapted screenplay when hearing the word used. Well, there's me for one. Besides, I don't think the OETD website has anything to do with OUP — let alone …
  • Terminals A1 and A2 is much preferable to A1 and A2 terminals I would guess that Car Park AB would be better than either of your suggestions. Renovation of the fire safety systems implies complete renovation of all the systems. If you don't m…
  • I don't see how the first interpretation could possibly be a true paraphrase. Qualify is vague, but the meaning can't be stretched to 'are definitely entitled to'. In this context, I don't see how it can have any meaning other than 'meet the c…
  • I would give a better grade for The news about her pregnancy is going to make headlines countrywide. And though it wouldn't get an even better grade, I'd prefer: News of her pregnancy is going to make headlines countrywide. I might also …
  • @theodora because it really sounds funny to say " The seaplane landed on water" Not to an English speaker. * Landquite often means 'end up' in a particular place — or, metaphorically, in a particular state. As early as 1679 someo…
  • You should ask at the airport itself, @tbey526. They must have chosen words and spelling for the three areas. I'm not aware of an airport which doesn't have the word order Terminal One, Terminal Two etc. And I'm pretty sure they all spell with U…
  • @nalabuzheva829, I'm afraid you're wrong. But I don't agree with your son's teacher either. The unit (I prefer to call is a NON-FINITE CLAUSE) children to go to our camp can function in place of a NOUN PHRASE * as an OBJECT — e.g. We want ch…
  • also, are linking verbs ever used with helping verbs? * helping verb is a term that a few grammars use in place of the traditional AUXILIARY. There are two classes of auxiliary in English —1. PRIMARY AUXILIARY — be, have, do —2. MODAL A…
  • We were busy studying is clearly a blend of we were busy and we were studying. WE understand the blend, so logically we must understand the structure. That leaves the problem of attaching labels to individual bits. It's a question of terminology,…
  • @ShayanAsmat, look at the dictionary on this website. Click on the word DICTIONARY in white letters on blue in the top left-hand corner. Look up small talk and talk NOUN. The phrase a talk is only possible when talk is used as a COUNT noun…
  • And look at this list of synonyms for reparable from the associated online dictionary: rectifiable, remediable, able to be put right, able to be set right, curable, restorable, recoverable, retrievable, salvageable Without knowing what…
  • The OED lists separate meanings for calculate for and calculate on. Calculate for is now used only in the PASSIVE be calculated for + NOUN PHRASE. On this construction and the similar be calculated to + INFINITIVE, calculated means 'arrange…
  • Lit doesn't work, and nor does spread. The usual adjective from light is lighted, but that won't work either. The usual adjective from spread is widespread, but I don't think that's what you mean. * Go to the Dictionary — via link in top…
  • @D10go_301060 ...the outbreak that develops in the south presented... Up to here, the text has all been in the PRESENT. The sudden PAST SIMPLE presented is very confusing. It seems to me that you you are writing about A. VERB FORMS 1…