As you are probably aware, our contemporary English content is now available through Lexico.com (https://www.lexico.com/en), and our old English dictionary site no longer exists.

As a result of this, this forum will be closed by 6th September.
We have already disabled new threads, but comments can still be posted on existing discussions to give a chance for outstanding questions to be answered.

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Thank you very much indeed, and good bye!
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Comments

  • (Quote) The spelling is right and the grammar is right. My only worry is that the definition you've found is very general. Many counties and areas have been controlled by other countries, and some still are — but very few controlled territories hav…
  • In the ACTIVE senetnce They regarded John as an expert it seems sensible to regard regard as as a PREPOSITIONAL VERB which is DITRANSITIVE with * John as OBJECT * an expert as OBJECT COMPLEMENT However, in the PASSIVE sentence John was regarded as…
  • @liyviyvuvo First of all, possibilities to do that is problematic. In almost every context I can think of it's ungrammatical. I can just about accept possibility to do that as meaning 'opportunity that has been provided so that someone can do th…
  • @tpetrescu505 [C] is, indeed the best, most natural answer. [B] and [D] are clearly wrong. [A] is stylistically awkward, but it is grammatical.
  • As a general rule, @apsttesc , * the champion refers to one unique champion * a champion refers to one of a number of champions So we would expect the middleweight boxing champion of Princeton — in this case the only current champion of the midd…
  • @MohammadReza, tag question have meanings, so more than one question tag is possible. * He knows that Tom is younger than Mary, doesn't he? The speaker * believes that some male person (known to both speaker and hearer) knows thatTom is younger th…
  • @bobak_ro The four letters used look like a WORD, but in a way the spelling is several different WORDS or parts of TWO-WORD FORMS. * one-word PAST SIMPLE form — e.g. We used a new method. * one-word ADJECTIVE — e.g. a used car * part of two-word P…
  • I stand corrected. For a time, I was able to access an old Oxford Dictionaries Online page as well as some Lexico pages. I concluded that Lexico was an interloper. Not so, alas! Personally, I can live without the extras which have been withheld. …
  • I googled Lexico and found some Spanish website. Nothing to do with OUP. But when I visited the website I saw that, like you, I'd somehow been directed to it. So, the immediate way to get rid of it is to quit Lexico and open Oxford Dictionaries. …
  • What is Lexico?
  • I said (Quote) This is not entirely true. The Greeks did admit the concept of rape by a god. Persephone was taken against her will by Hades. And Daphne would have been raped by Apollo if she had not been transformed into a tree. What happened (or …
  • There is no evidence that Zeus forced himself on Europa. The ancient Greeks did not live in 2019. In their world view, gods were irresistible, so of course Europa would have succumbed to Zeus's courtship. The linguistic point behind the naming wa…
  • @Harten (Quote) This is often the wrong question — even when the sentence is perfectly grammatical, conventionally punctuated, and written by a native speaker. (Quote) This, as always, is the right question. But the answer can't be found in that s…
  • @glee2019 Either of them doesn't wear glasses is not grammatical. Many would say that Neither of them wear glasses is also ungrammatical — because neither is SINGULAR. The safest thing to write is Neither of them wears glasses
  • @Sk78843 The sentence is perfectly grammatical. It does sounds a little strange — but not because of the grammar. It would be unusual to refer to a person as 'someone's friend' — but not impossible. For example: — We need four horses for the car…
  • I can't do a screen shot, but here's the text (Quote) The cross-reference is to (Quote)
  • @Anm83 The grammatical term is ELLIPSIS. It means missing out a word or group of words which can easily be 'understood'. In this sentence the words missed out are [it is] It is ignored at the best of times and [it is] too dangerously polluted to …
  • There It's hard to think of a context where you would write this — except perhaps as a an explanation of something previously written. We do have some evidence for this. There is the latest update... In speech, it could be said while pointing to a …
  • @hfhua1949 The countries' ambassadors This can only refer to a group of more than one people, each of whom is an ambassador of a country. Since countries is plural, we know that at least two of those people are ambassadors of different countries. T…
  • @lflower462 (Quote) This is ungrammatical because PRESENT PERFECT forms in English are used to locate the action or process in a period UP TO NOW. The word yesterday denotes a period BEFORE NOW. (Quote) This is ungrammatical — for the very simple …
  • None of those words sound right to me. I could use wide-ranging.
  • @hknte * if it were FORMAL STYLE — especially written prose * if it was INFORMAL STYLE — especially conversational speech The expression Wouldn't it be great? is * SPOKEN — contrasted with WRITTEN Would it not? * CONVERSATIONAL — great contraste…
  • Finally ... * Two different reference points* the time that she got home — i.e. lunch preparation was earlier * after she got home — i.e. you waited until she came home and then made lunch but then something else happened Suddenly we realised th…
  • To continue ... * Two different reference points * noon — by is OK at the start of the sentence By noon he'd been playing computer games for two hours. * later then noon — before This makes sense if we're describing the consequence. For exampl…
  • (Quote) * From point of view of the speaker/writer * if the reference point is earlier today then the bed-time was yesterday or last night * if the reference point is before today then the bed-time was the night beforet * The sentence makes sens…
  • @irmantasgn * OK * It depends the reference time when he was tired. The most likely adverbial is the night before. * OK * OK * OK * Both are possible — with different meanings. * Both are possible — with different meanings. * OK * OK — although wit…
  • @tsights260 The form comes is also a problem. Since the author has failed to communicate his/her meaning in this sentence, your only hope is to read the rest of the chapter — including the text before this sentence. Then try to answer: * What is…
  • Attach = 'create a mental association' a face = 'a memory of a person — recognised in the same way that you recognise a face' For example, when you buy a cheese, you remember the cheesemaker. And in future, every time you see that cheese, or even t…
  • You could start by substituting how extensive. Yes, full and true will need to become fully and truly — but not in the MAIN CLAUSE. * It is difficult to assess how fully extensive the damage is. (or was) * She was exaggerating how extensive the pro…
  • @irmantasgn, I think you're approaching the task from the wrong direction. The functions of the PAST SIMPLE and PAST PERFECT are not primarily to relate events in time relative to each other. In continuous speech or writing the task is to refer even…