Comments

  • At the top of the scree on the left you can see the word DICTIONARY in white letters on blue. Click on it and type in underdog.
  • Neither is correct. It must be a desk or the desk or my desk. I suspect you might mean I'm sitting at my desk.
  • Try superfluous.
  • The text doesn't attempt to describe the actual procedure, so it can't be accused of misrepresenting it. It conveys the essential information that the chemical is introduced to the exterior of the glove. Apply to may not be the perfect verb, but I d…
  • It's impossible to comment on the sentence without knowing the context. Are there other sentences before or after it? Is there a picture with it? Without this information, I don't know whether the PRESENT SIMPLE shares is appropriate. There ma…
  • @jbroadstock128, the first sentence could be compatible with your scenario. But it couldn't suggest it.
  • @norwegianblue I take issue with the suggestion that all great red wines are made from Pinot Noir! Impeccable usage. I would have found it strange if you'd written: I take issue with the suggestion that all great red wines are made …
  • @varuna, the definitions are for five grammatically different phrases: 1. the Last Day 2. the last days 3. X's last day 4. the last days of X 5. last day All of these have special meanings — quite different from a phrase like the last day of…
  • @ashokin573, the words physics is always singular. This is true for most similar nouns in -ics. * I think it's true for nouns denoting etc as something you study —_ economics, robotics, mathematics_ etc * It's not true when the noun denotes…
  • If you look up empirical on the Online Dictionary, and click on More example sentences. https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/empirical Of the 21 example sentences, six contain the phrase empirical evidence. ADJECTIVE Based o…
  • @Prudence, the vocabulary of the senses can be tricky. Let's start with sound and sight. English has verbs for * a person making an effort * a person having an experience, without making an effort * a thing affecting a person So for so…
  • @hwaddah67, something is impeccable if it's impossible to find fault with it. In this context, the photographs would be impeccable evidence if you could prove that they have not been photoshopped or otherwise altered. But it's perfectly possib…
  • Your second question is much easier, though my answer is longer, I'm afraid. When the verb work means 'do ones job' then it;s INTRANSITIVE. This means that it isn't followed by an OBJECT. If your workplace is Acme Industries, you can't say I w…
  • @notericmeyer, we don't say In where do you sleep? We say Where do you sleep? The word where and and the word in don't mix — except when where is in a question and in is in an answer. This is not true of from and to. We can ask Fr…
  • @Kennybenjamin, the OED has found that agriculturist also exists, and seems to have been invented slightly before agriculturalist. Both date from the late eighteenth century. There's no word-formation body laying down rules. Somebody invents a ne…
  • @Mahnaz12, make is usually described as a TRANSITIVE verb, ie a verb with ONE OBJECT. But there are other possibilities. You yourself used one: This sentence maked me shocked (Actually, it should be made.) In this clause, shocked i…
  • @notericmeyer, with is wrong in all three sentences. * If you say X is confused with Y you mean 'People don't know the difference between X and Y' or 'People say X when they mean Y' * If you say I'm ashamed with you or I'm jealous w…
  • @hwaddah67, there is no such concept as a civil affairs in Britain. Nor, I think, is the term used in America or any other English-speaking country that I know about. If you write to English speakers outside your country, you will have to explain…
  • When i said And ID is meaningless. I meant that the term has no official meaning. Nobody issues anything which is termed 'ID'. When someone says, 'Do you have any ID?', they mean 'Do you have a document which proves your identity to…
  • From an issuing point of view a driving licence and a passport are completely different documents with completely distinct functions and purposes. And ID is meaningless. It's only for verification that these things come comparable.
  • @Hannaleksa, I suspect that your language has a different meaning for formation. In English things are formed but people are trained. So I would start Training in ... I'm not sure what you mean by information culture. If it's an established te…
  • 'Documents in general' are called documentation. A 'field of working' is expressed by a phrase based on a verbal noun such as confirmation of identity or establishment of identity. You could perhaps use the single word identification if the conte…
  • A document is not a procedure. A driving licence or a passport may be a proof of status or proof of identity. ID is a deliberately vague term, which sometimes refers to a document. Personal status doesn't really mean anything. Do you mean identit…
  • Modern grammarians are careful to make a distinction between ACCUSATIVE and OBJECT. * ACCUSATIVE — denotes a form * OBJECT — denotes a functional role in a clause We need the term ACCUSATIVE to describe the grammar of Old English. However,…
  • Although abstract noun is useless as a grammatical term, people often use the phrase with a non-grammatical meaning. Typically, people use abstract noun to mean a quality shared by a number of specific examples. For example goodness is a quali…
  • @mgupta664, voice is a COUNTABLE NOUN. The only important grammatical differences between nouns are: * PROPER NOUN vs COMMON NOUN * COUNTABLE NOUN vs UNCOUNTABLE NOUN The term abstract noun is not useful in grammatical description. …
  • @mgraves13 Since they're source materials, it seems to me that you're free to make your own choice of punctuation. If you want to present its as a question, then punctuate it accordingly. My only reservation is that I don't think it's such a g…
  • @Mark_S If I were to write a letter of complaint about this increase, would it not be correct to say that 'on 1st September 2018 I received a letter stating that my council tax is £500' because, technically, the letter from 1st September does …
  • I've never heard (or read) spare used in that way. No dictionary lists this sense. So I don't believe anyone would understand what you meant by the question. The most likely context for the phrase a spare girl is a situation where there are suppo…
  • I think the general principle for sentences like this is that the assertion must be relevant at the time of speaking (or writing). So, when Theresa May is no longer Prime Minister, the assertion She is the worst Prime Minister of all time i…