As you are probably aware, our contemporary English content is now available through Lexico.com (https://www.lexico.com/en), and our old English dictionary site no longer exists.

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Comments

  • I'm not sure where you got your information from, but I would doubt its authenticity. The Oxford Dictionary of English gives the current usage definition as "A thing known or proved to be true" which seems like a straightforwadrly acceptab…
    in Fact Comment by AmosDuveen August 2018
  • Hi don't know what you would call that particular style of structure, or whether it even has a name, but I would probably describe that top beam as a cross-beam.
  • To add to what @joughtred said, I don't think there is any clear semantic distinction between the different forms and that, to a greater or lesser extent, they can be used to mean multiple different senses. The only think I can think of off the top…
  • Hi @DavidCrosbie, I think we both ought to clarify our terms. I was thinking of external logic (i.e. does it stand up to scrutiny to the outside world) as contrasted with the internal logic of the story. As for chronology, there will always be a c…
  • Have you tried the OED? (Quote) Examples for sense A2 are: (Quote)
  • Hi @jlevine429, I think your questioning of the breadth of sense 1 is the key issue. Returning to the precise wording "A spoken or written account of connected events; a story", there seems to be no explicit suggestion of chronology or ev…
  • The sentence is correct as it is. I'm sure @DavidCrosbie can provide a fuller explanation but it seems to me that had better is a separate phrase inserted between the subject and the verb which turns the sentence into a suggestion as opposed to an a…
  • Hi @jlevine429, I think Oxford Dictionaries Online covers your definition rather well (here) in subsense 1.3: (Quote) You seem to be arguing that the patchwork nature of the various postulates does not amount to a cohesive sequence of events, ergo…
  • Hi @DavidCrosbie, I think that, however we choose to interpret the text, we can at least agree that the wording ought to be interpreted literally rather than idiomatically.
  • From the Kipling Society, here: (Quote)
  • PS, you seem to be using the character ` (the button just above [TAB] on a UK keyboard) instead of ' (a normal apostrophe), which is why the text has gone funny.
  • You'll need to provide more context to judge whether the phrase is idiomatic or not. I've not heard of any such idiom, but that would not preclude the possibility. A quick Google search turns up this: (Quote) This reads to me like a reference to p…
  • Hi @drlee7779, (Quote) It's complex because context is the key here. Sense 1.1 of close relates to groupings or structure rather than the context you are questioning which is the relative position of two objects. What makes things more difficult is…
  • Hi @drlee7779, Sorry, was busy checking me link and accidentally posted before finishing my comment! The sense 1.1 of close here, relates to structure rather than the proximity of individual objects. As regards the proximity of individual objects…
  • Hi @drlee7779, The sense 1.1 oc close here
  • Re the piece of paper: I honestly never expected to see Bernoulli's principle used in quite this way. Is this a standard technique when teaching pronunciations or did someone just get very creative?
  • Hi @norwegianblue, I cannot recall seeing too many possessive apostrophes in such situations. Thinking about it, you are referring to instructions for a user rather than instructions belonging to a user. Obviously, it will often be the case that bo…
  • Not from Oxford (at least not publicly); however, there are open access corpora out there, for example here, which may be of some use to you.
  • Hi @MaryNovik, I don't think there are any criteria about what words are can be submitted (other than being in English usage) but in terms of where the editors require most assistance from the general public, non-digital is rightly where the focus …
  • Hi @MaryNovik, I think it is an oblique reference to the massive corpora Oxford use which are constantly scraping text from all sorts of places in the hope of identifying linguistic changes. The digital age makes it much easier to do this so the ch…
  • I wouldn't think of a rundown as being in any way detailed, more of a summary or overview. Here is the relevant definition from the OED: (Quote)
  • More info here.
  • Everyone has their own take; -ise endings are certainly more popular in the UK but Oxford Dictionaries follow the Oxford University Press editorial policy which stipulates the use of -ize for etymological reasons. Note that some words always need -i…
  • Hi @cxharmon, I think there are actually two separate elements to your question. Firstly: is it a word?, to which the answer is yes on the basis that it is an utterance with a specific meaning. Secondly, there is the broader question of whether the…
  • Hi @lburns695, The OED defines 'gyle' as: (Quote) NB: 'gyle-tun' is synonymous with 'gyle-fat', which is: (Quote)
    in Gyle Comment by AmosDuveen March 2018
  • Hi @Peter7, We are offering alternatives because both forms could be either fine or odd depending on who is reading the note and so finding a suitable alternative that pleases everyone would be better. I mentioned in my original reply that: (Quot…
  • Hi @Peter7, In that situation, you can use a few different constructions; the simplest would take the form of a to do list, which would do away with many of the grammatical quirks which can trip you up when writing full sentences: (Quote)
  • On reflection, maybe a better construction would be: the next shift must replace the/a switch. This would scan equally well however you interpret the word shift.
  • Hi @Peter7, As regards the verb, it depends on who/what "the next shift" is. Either form could be considered correct depending on whether you see the "shift" as a single entity or as a collective term for group of individuals wh…