A long-bearded man OR A long beard man, which one is correct and why?

We say in English: A man with a long beard (post modifier), now to use pre-modifier, we say:
A long-bearded man OR A long-beard man ... which one is correct: bearded or beard? Also, what do we call using this form of adjective (by adding ed to the noun as in bearded) ?

Answers

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭

    @shaddad443, If I heard or saw
    a long beard man
    I would take it to mean
    'a man who specialises in long beards'.
    I would then try to make sense of it — a specialist hairdresser, perhaps.

    Bearded is one of countless words where NOUN + SUFFIX produces an ADJECTIVE with a regular meaning.
    It wouldn't be at all, helpful to have a term for each of these many many patterns of word-formation.

    NOUN + -ed is tricky.
    It's OK with beard because it's so obviously a noun, not a verb.
    But there are words like seed which can be a noun, but also a verb meaning 'removed the seeds'.
    So seeded grapes could mean 'grapes with seeds removed' — although it more often means 'grapes with seeds'.
    Worse, seed can be a verb meaning 'sort out the best' — as in a sports competition.
    The person sorted is seeded.
    But then we make a noun from the verb and term that person a seed.

    I think it's more common to add -ed to a phrase like long beard than to a single noun.

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