Which one is correct?

1) your salary remains the same, which is USD1,000 per week with effect from 1 June 2019.

2) your salary has remained the same, which is USD1,000 per week with effect from 1 June 2019.

Which sentence is correct?

Comments

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭

    The PRESENT PERFECT expresses the meaning 'up to now'.
    However, the word remain also expresses the meaning 'up to now'.
    So in that part of the sentence it makes no difference.

    In fact Your salary has remained the same can be used in a different sense to mean
    'Throughout a period of time up to now, your salary has stayed constant.'
    But I don't think thsi is what you mean.

    There are problems, though, with the rest of the sentence.
    Instead of the RELATIVE CLAUSE after the same, I very much prefer namely:
    Your salary remains the same, namely USD 1,000 per week.

    It makes no sense to say with effect from when it isn't the starting date.
    If your salary is the same as it was, then the starting point was some time in the past.

  • "The PRESENT PERFECT expresses the meaning 'up to now'.
    However, the word remain also expresses the meaning 'up to now'.
    So in that part of the sentence it makes no difference."

    I don't claim to know anything about grammar, but the two mean entirely different things to me.
    The first means the salary is not changing at this time. It may have changed in the past.
    The second means it has not changed in the past. It may be changing now.

    Well, ignoring the end of the sentence, which is pretty much gibberish.

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭
    edited May 14

    The first means the salary is not changing at this time. It may have changed in the past.

    Yes.

    The second means it has not changed in the past. It may be changing now.

    No, it doesn't mean that.
    To express this meaning you'd have to say something different such as
    Your salary has always been the same
    Your salary never changed
    Your salary always remained the same

    If we use the PRESENT PERFECT it's always because something in the past is relevant to now.
    Sometimes the relevance is that something has just this minute happened.
    In this case, something just this minute didn't happen. Your salary didn't change.

    Yes, we can use the verb remain with reference to the PAST, but we need to signal that the failure to change doesn't refer to now. For example
    In the past your salary has remained the same
    Your salary has always remained the same

    Even so, the sentences make better sense with some mention of when in the past your salary might have changed but didn't. For exampe
    With each new contract...
    Annually, ...

    One or twice in your career,... (implying that the failure to change was unusual)

    In all these sentences using has remained to refer to the past, there's an implication:
    'But now it's going to change'
    or. just possibly
    'So you won't be surprised to hear that we're going to be mean to you again'

    In fact, both PRESENT SIMPLE Your salary remains the same and PRESENT PERFECT Your salary has remained the same are slightly odd. It would be more natural to say Your salary will remain the same.

    The PRESENT SIMPLE suggests 'This is what your new contract says'.
    The PRESENT PERFECT suggests 'This is what we have decided for your new contract'.

  • 2 is just not correct.
    2) your salary has remained the same, which is USD1,000 per week with effect from 1 June 2019.

    Rewritten it works: It has been the same $1000 and will remain the same at June 1, 2019 and gong forward.
    Even 1 is wrong: 1) your salary remains the same, which is USD1,000 per week with effect from 1 June 2019. It needs to be rewritten as above

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