Part of Speech

Please consider the sentence:

'She enjoys watching television every day.'

Clearly, 'she' is the subject and enjoys is the 'verb'

Is 'watching' a verb here or a gerund?
Also, what role does television "television". I mean part of speech / classification in grammar (whether it is connected to 'watching')

Thanks
Rahul

Comments

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭

    @rampuria

    Clearly, 'she' is the subject and enjoys is the 'verb'

    When we say the verb we mean 'the verb of the clause'.
    We're using verb to mean a FUNCTION.

    But we also use the word verb to mean 'word class'.

    • enjoy belongs to the WORD CLASS verb
    • enjoys is a FINITE FORM of the verb enjoy

    • watch also belongs the WORD CLASS verb

    • watching is a NON-FINITE FORM of the verb watch

    Some grammars use a different term for the FUNCTION.
    They say that enjoys is the PREDICATOR in the CLAUSE.

    The functions of the three parts of the clause are:

    • She — SUBJECT
    • enjoys — VERB (or PREDICATOR)
    • watching television — OBJECT

    The OBJECT takes the form of a phrase which is constructed like a CLAUSE.

    • We can't say She is watching on the television
      and we can't say watching on the television

    • We can't say She is watching John television
      and we can't say watching John television

    • We can't say She is watching television to John
      and we can't say watching television to John

    The possibilities are the almost the same with the FINITE VERB FORM is watching and the NON-FINITE VERB FORM watching.
    That's why modern grammars describe watching television as a NON-FINITE CLAUSE.

    The differences between FINITE and NON-FINITE clauses is that

    • a NON-FINITE CLAUSE can't be the MAIN CLAUSE of a sentence — and it can't be the only clause
      If we're writing in COMPLETE SENTENCES,
      we can't write Watching television when she gets home.
      and we can't write Watching television.

    • a FINITE CLAUSE must have a SUBJECT but a NON-FINITE CLAUSE often dosen't
      If we're writing in COMPLETE SENTENCES,
      we can't write Is watching television.
      But we can write watching television as a NON-FINITE SUBORDINATE CLAUSE.

    The functions of the two parts of the CLAUSE watching television are

    • watching — VERB (or PREDICATOR)
    • television — OBJECT

    Is 'watching' a verb here or a gerund?

    Some grammars do not use the term gerund.
    But for those grammars which still use the term watching as used here is an example.

    So we can say enjoying here is BOTH a verb AND a gerund.

Sign In or Register to comment.