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Commas WITHIN subordinate clauses

I'm aware of the rules regarding punctuation before subordinate clauses, but want to double check on the rules regarding commas within subordinate clauses. Specifically, when the subordinate clause contains two independent clauses within it, should you use a comma before the conjunction or no?
Specific example:
Amanda writes that she received Johanna's letters, and she will now forward them to Kate.
OR
Amanda writes that she received Johanna's letters and she will now forward them to Kate.

In both cases, the portions refer to what Amanda is writing that she will do, not what Amanda is doing (if that makes sense).

Or is it required that I re-use the relative pronoun in this case?
Amanda writes that she received Johanna's letters and that she will now forward them to Kate.

Comments

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭

    I don't think there are any rules concerning punctuation before subordinate clauses, @pizzollo.

    There is a very general rule that we don't place a comma between a VERB and its OBJECT. In English this is taken to include INDIRECT SPEECH. In your sentence:

    • writes is the VERB
    • that she received Johanna's letters is its OBJECT

    The problem with your sentence is that the words could mean
    either
    'she writes that she will now forward them to Kate'
    or
    'I can tell you that she will now forward them to Kate'
    Punctuation can't remove the ambiguity.

    I wouldn't use the word 'required', but I do think it's clearer to write
    Amanda writes that she received Johanna's letters, and that she will now forward them to Kate.

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