Infinitive or Gerund?

Hi, my son's teacher corrected his paper in this sentence to the following:
Our goal is inspiring children to go to our camp. My son's original sentence was "our goal is** to inspire children to go to our camp.
When I read her sentence I interpreted her "inspiring" to be more participle I, than a gerund. That is we want (what kind of children)-inspiring- children to go to the camp (that is only children who inspire others). A similar sentence would be. Our goal is melting snow to be moved out of the streets.
Am I wrong or right?
thank you

Comments

  • @nalabuzheva829, I'm afraid you're wrong. But I don't agree with your son's teacher either.

    The unit (I prefer to call is a NON-FINITE CLAUSE) children to go to our camp can function in place of a NOUN PHRASE

    • as an OBJECT — e.g. We want children to go to camp
    • after a PREPOSITION — e.g. for children to go to camp

    But it's much harder to think of sentence in which it can function as a SUBJECT or COMPLEMENT

    • Children to go to camp is our goal is understandable, but doesn't sound grammatical.
      I think I could say Children going to camp is our goal.
      But I'd prefer to break the sentence: Children going to camp. That's our goal.

    • Our goal is children to go to camp sounds completely ungrammatical.

    • It could be fixed with forOur goal is for children to go to camp

    Adding an adjective doesn't make it sound more gammatical

    • We want nice children to go to camp — OK
    • for nice children to go to camp — OK
    • Nice children to go to camp is our goal — doesn't sound grammatical
    • Our goal is nice children to go to camp — doesn't sound grammatical

    If we substitute inspiring, it sounds partly OK in the first two

    • We want inspiring children to go to camp — OK
    • for inspiring children to go to camp — reasonably OK, except that it's ambiguous
      It can easily be understood as 'for the purpose of inspiring children to go to camp'

    With the second two, if we substitute inspiring it will be understood as a clause beginning with a VERB — meaning 'the inspiration of children'

    • Inspiring children to go to camp is our goal
    • Our goal is inspiring children to go to camp — your son's teacher's sentence

    So far, I agree with the teacher. Where I disagree is that I don't see anything wrong with Our goal is to inspire children to go to camp.
    You son's sentence and the teacher's correction are equally grammatical, and have the same meaning.
    Possibly the text around the sentence made the teacher feel that her version was stylistically more appropriate.
    Possibly she simply objected to having two INFINITIVES together.

  • I do not think anything is wrong with your son's original sentence which reads "our goal is** to inspire children to go to our camp." Although, I do not understand what the two stars (**) that look like an exponent to "is" means. But if you remove the two stars, the sentence is just as perfect as it is grammatically correct.

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