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Sequence of Tenses

Hey!

I had an argument with classmates over whether the following sentence should go like this:

  1. I left my house yesterday in a hurry, but I hadn't gone far before I discovered that it was going to rain, and I had left my umbrella at home.

or like this:

  1. I left my house yesterday in a hurry, but I hadn't gone far before I discovered that it had been going to rain, and I had left my umbrella at home.

Which of them is grammatically correct? Can you explain to me why? Thank you.

Comments

  • There are two definite TIMES that you refer to. Both of them were 'yesterday'.

    1. the time that you discovered the situation.
      Lets call it THEN 1
    2. the time that you left your hour.
      Let's call it THEN 2

    There are two PERIODS

    1. after you left the house but before you discovered things .
      Let's call it UP TO THEN 1
    2. before you left the house.
      Let's call it UP TO THEN 2

    Your little story refers to these HAPPENINGS/PERCEPTIONS

    1. an EVENT: You left your house
    2. a STATE: You hadn't gone far
    3. another EVENT : You made your discovery
    4. a PERCEPTION : It was going to rain
    5. an EVENT: You left your umbrella at home.

    So Let's place the EVENTS/PREDICTIONS at the TIMES or in the PERIODS

    I left my house yesterday
    PAST SIMPLE for an EVENT at a definite TIME (THEN 2)

    but

    I hadn't gone far
    PAST PERFECT for a STATE in the UP TO THEN 2

    before

    I discovered
    PAST PERFECT for an EVEN at a definite time (THEN 1)

    that

    it [BE] going to rain
    PREDICTION

    and

    I had left my umbrella at home
    PAST PERFECT for an EVENT at an indefinite time in the period UP TO THEN 2

    It remains to assign a verb for to the PREDICTION.
    This must show when you made the discovery.
    Was it in at the time THEN 1 or in the period UP TO THEN 2?

    Both are possible, but one is nonsensical.
    If the prediction was made in UP TO THEN 2, why didn't you discover it until THEN 1?

    The prediction was made at time THEN 1, so the verb is PAST

    it was going to rain

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