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Horticulturalist??

Hi all, i have joined for the specific reason to get an answer to the following question. I work in the horticulture industry and consider myself a horticulturalist..... apparently the correct term is horticulturist???? 

Oxford accepts agriculturalist, permaculturalist, multiculturalist etc but not horticulturalist? 

Agriculture..... agricultural... . agriculturalist

Horticulture.... horticultural.... horticulturalist? 

Surely these should be the same? 

As an example i will use the words “Furturist” or “Agronomist”..... furtural or agronimal are not used so why does horticulture fall under these rules?

It makes no sense to me? 

Comments

  • @Kennybenjamin, the OED has found that agriculturist also exists, and seems to have been invented slightly before agriculturalist. Both date from the late eighteenth century.

    There's no word-formation body laying down rules. Somebody invents a new term and people either copy it or they don't.

    • From future only futurist has been invented.

    • From structure both structurist and structuralist have been invented — though they are used by different disciplines.

    As an example i will use the words “Furturist” or “Agronomist”..... furtural or agronimal are not used so why does horticulture fall under these rules?

    It seems that you've discovered the only 'rule' — i.e. generalisation — that we can make. This is:

    If there is no adjective in -al, then there is no noun in -alist

    The converse is not true. We can't say

    If there is an adjective in -al, then there is a noun in -alist

    Sometimes there is. Sometimes there isn't.

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