"Interested" must be followed by preposition "in" all the time???

I have never heard, nor read that I MUST add the preposition "in" after "interested". I know that we have to use "in" in order to explain what I'm interested in, but if somebody already says the topic, object or what I'm interested in, why should I answer repeating the same reason, or object? Like: Are you interested in going to the beach with your whole family? Yes!, I am interested in going to the beach with my whole family. I mean, "Yes, I'm so interested" "I'm not interested" IS ENOUGH or is it wrong? because somebody else is implying or explaining ALREADY! right? So there is NO NEEED to add the preposition "in" ALL THE TIME to explain what I'm interested in, again! Can I just say: "I'm not interested" without adding the preposition "in"? Or do I need to use it because of a grammar rule? 

Comments

  • @Manson101, I think you've read some confusing grammar advice. The reality is:

    • You can't use a different preposition such as I'm interested into or I'm interested at.
    • You can't have an OBJECT without a proposition such as I'm interested reading.
    • But you can use interested alone with in it 'understood'.
  • @DavidCrosbie Thank you. I understand everything you said. My questions is if someone already asked me something (the object) (Do you want to buy our puppy?) can I just say "I'm not interested" without adding the preposition "in" or is it a grammar rule which compels me to add it all the time?

    Thanks in advance. 
  • You can certainly say 'I'm not interested'.

    There is absolutely no grammar rule which compels you to add in.

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