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Address in a line

Hi,

If you had to write an address in a line, would it be
1) 8 D'Arblay Street, London. W1f8A
2) 8 D'Arblay Street, London, W1f8A

Just having a discussion with my boss about full stops and commas!

Thanks

Veronika

Comments

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    1. Why do you want to write the address on one line? I can't think of any style which calls for this. Are you writing on a ribbon? Or on a narrow strip of paper?
    2. I don't think any style uses a full stop.
    3. Traditional style would use a comma after 8. Modern style uses no commas anywhere.
    4. The letters in a postcode are always UPPER CASE. This is important as they are usually read not by humans but by machines. Lower case f might not be recognised.
    5. I don't think there are any postcodes without a space. For example the OUP address in Oxford is OX2 6DP.
  • Half the message is not showing. Here's the rest:

    1. The letters in a postcode are always UPPER CASE. This is important as they are usually read not by humans but by machines. Lower case f might not be recognised.
    2. I don't think there are any postcodes without a space. For example the OUP address in Oxford is OX2 6DP.
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