Where's the verb?

"Dysfunctional double-bind of border-fever, mapping out the universe into which Mr. Patrick Braden, now some years later found himself tumbled".

The main clause, as I understand, is "Dysfunctional double-bind of border-fever'. Then, why is there comma between "Braden" and "now"? And where is the predicate of the main clause?

Comments

  • I've located the actual sentence from which this fragment comes:

    The arbitrary nature of the border between the North and the South is obvious and clearly delineated here, relating as it does to Braden's own negotiation of gender categories: 'Dysfunctional double-bind of border-fever, mapping out the universe into which Mr. Patrick Braden, now some years later found himself tumbled'.

    The fragment has no main clause because it isn't a sentence. Grammatically it's what might be called an extended noun phrase. It's built around the noun double-bind .

    It includes a relative clause:

    into which Mr. Patrick Braden, now some years later found himself tumbled

    Before this, there's a phrase which modern grammars call a non-finite clause:

    mapping out the universe

    The noun double-bind picks up an idea from earlier on the sentence:

    • possibly The arbitrary nature of the border
    • possibly Braden's own negotiation
  • I said

    The noun double-bind picks up an idea from earlier on the sentence:

    Sorry, that's not quite right. In fact, it's the other way round.

    The writer of the sentence intends either the words
    The arbitrary nature of the border

    or the words
    Braden's own negotiation

    to interpret what's meant by the noun double-bind in the fragment after the colon The point is that that the fragment is a quotation.

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