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Such as... OR or AND?

Hello,

When we use "such as" to introduce an examples list, the last term listed should be preceded by OR or AND?

Example: She bought a lot, such as T-shirts, pants AND/OR socks.

Thanks for your support.

Anna

Comments

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭
    edited January 2018

    When we talk about or write about a number of examples, Anna, the distinction between AND and OR may be lost. The phrase such as can easily be replaced:

    She likes buying small items of clothing for him, such as T-shirts, pants and socks.
    She likes buying small items of clothing for him, such as T-shirts, pants or socks.

    There are good bargains to be found in that store, for example T-shirts, pants and socks.
    There are good bargains to be found in that store, for example T-shirts, pants or socks.

    [I've changes your sentence, because She bought a lot suggests that she made one purchase of many things. Besides, those articles of clothing aren't examples of a lot. You could avoid this by writing

    She would buy many things to wear.

    If you really want to use a lot, I think you have to write something like:

    She used to buy a lot. For example she bought T-shirts, pants and socks.
    She used to buy a lot. For example she bought T-shirts, pants or socks.
    ]

  • No. It is a list. There is nothing alternative about its cintents

  • If you are choosing a number of items, AND precedes the last one.

    If you are choosing from a list of alternatives, then OR precedes the last item.

    Regards...

    Bernard

    Regards...

    Bernard

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭
    edited February 2018

    Reply to @JMaoles

    No. It is a list. There is nothing alternative about its contents.

    But it's a list of examples. That's why both AND and OR are possible.

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭
    edited February 2018

    Reply to @BeeTee-Ess

    If you are choosing a number of items, AND precedes the last one.

    If you are choosing from a list of alternatives, then OR precedes the last item.

    Yes, but Anna wasn't choosing. She was illustrating by means of an open-ended list of examples.

    The idea of choosing is fine if the list is a closed set.

    As I read it, Anna's sentence only makes sense if she made several choices — on (at least) one occasion choosing T-shirts, on one or more others choosing pants, and on a further one or more choosing socks.

    These choices can be seen collectively — prompting the word AND. But they can also been seen as alternatives — prompting the word OR.

  • @portella_anna said:
    Hello,

    When we use "such as" to introduce an examples list, the last term listed should be preceded by OR or AND?

    Example: She bought a lot, such as T-shirts, pants AND/OR socks.

    Thanks for your support.

    Anna

    @DavidCrosbie said:
    When we talk about or write about a number of examples, Anna, the distinction between AND and OR may be lost. The phrase such as can easily be replaced:

    She likes buying small items of clothing for him, such as T-shirts, pants and socks.
    She likes buying small items of clothing for him, such as T-shirts, pants or socks.

    There are good bargains to be found in that store, for example T-shirts, pants and socks.
    There are good bargains to be found in that store, for example T-shirts, pants or socks.

    [I've changes your sentence, because She bought a lot suggests that she made one purchase of many things. Besides, those articles of clothing aren't examples of a lot. You could avoid this by writing

    She would buy many things to wear.

    If you really want to use a lot, I think you have to write something like:

    She used to buy a lot. For example she bought T-shirts, pants and socks.
    She used to buy a lot. For example she bought T-shirts, pants or socks.
    ]

    @DavidCrosbie said:
    When we talk about or write about a number of examples, Anna, the distinction between AND and OR may be lost. The phrase such as can easily be replaced:

    She likes buying small items of clothing for him, such as T-shirts, pants and socks.
    She likes buying small items of clothing for him, such as T-shirts, pants or socks.

    There are good bargains to be found in that store, for example T-shirts, pants and socks.
    There are good bargains to be found in that store, for example T-shirts, pants or socks.

    [I've changes your sentence, because She bought a lot suggests that she made one purchase of many things. Besides, those articles of clothing aren't examples of a lot. You could avoid this by writing

    She would buy many things to wear.

    If you really want to use a lot, I think you have to write something like:

    She used to buy a lot. For example she bought T-shirts, pants and socks.
    She used to buy a lot. For example she bought T-shirts, pants or socks.
    ]

    Thanks for your response, David.

    So I understand that it doesn't make any difference if I use AND or OR. Is that right?

  • Anna, it doesn't make any difference with examples. But with other lists it may make a big difference.

  • Only4PetsOnly4Pets
    edited February 2018

    Can someone explain in more details?

  • Hi @Only4Pets,

    What exactly are you having difficulty with?

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