What is the difference between the meaning 1 and 1.1?

Where can I find user guidelines for the definition of a word?
I can not seem to find a page that tells me how to configure the dictionary.

If the definition of a word has 1 meaning and 1.1 meaning, what is the difference between them?
Is the meaning of 1.1 also one of the various meanings of the word?

Comments

  • SimoneSimone admin

    Hi @drlee7779
    Sorry for the delay in dealing with your question!
    Before I post a reply, let me just double-check with one of the editors, as they might want to add information to my answer.
    Bear with me!

  • Thank you for answer.

    The reason for this question is that when an object is attached to an object, I wonder if I can use the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close (With very little or no space in between; dense.).

    I will wait for your reply.
    Thank you.

  • SimoneSimone admin
    edited May 8

    Hi again, @drlee7779

    So you were on the right track in guessing what the numbers mean. :)
    Our entries are divided up into ‘core senses’ and ‘sub-senses’.

    So sense 1 is a core sense, sense 1.1, 1.2 are sub-senses of that core sense. An entry can have more than one core sense – these would be numbered 2, 3, etc.

    Core senses represent typical, central uses of the word in question. The core sense acts as the gateway to the other, related sub-senses. There is a logical relationship between each sub-sense and the core sense under which it appears – these relationships are various, but include figurative or metaphorical extensions of the core sense, specialized uses of the core sense, or another extension or shift in meaning from the core sense.

    As an example, see the entry page for the word spring.

    I hope this helps and, again, sorry for the delay in getting back to you!

  • Thank you very much. It was clear to the kind and detailed answer.

    When an object is attached to an object, can I use the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close (With very little or no space in between; dense.)?

    That's why I asked this question.

    I want you to help me.
    Thank you.

  • SimoneSimone admin

    hi @drlee7779
    Oh, sorry, you comment with the question about 'close' came in with a delay, I didn't see it before!
    Could you give me an example of the use of 'close' you have in mind?
    It will be easier to look at the actual sentence you are trying to put together :)

  • Hi @drlee7779,

    The sense 1.1 oc close here

  • Hi @drlee7779,

    Sorry, was busy checking me link and accidentally posted before finishing my comment!

    The sense 1.1 of close here, relates to structure rather than the proximity of individual objects.

    As regards the proximity of individual objects, "close" tends to refer to a nearby proximity but still separate. If you are referring to objects attached to each other or touching sides then words like next or adjacent would be more appropriate.

  • Hi @Simone,
    I am deeply grateful for your kindness.

    In the sentence "The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment tightly apposed to the cementum.", The word 'apposed' was used.
    (Structurally, the epithelial attachment is attached to the cementum.)

    Because the word 'apposed' is a past participle of the verb appose, I looked up the verb 'appose' in the dictionary.

    Since the meaning of the verb 'appose' is "Place (something) side by side with or close to something else.", I looked up the 'side by side' in the dictionary.

    The first meaning of 'side by side' is "close together and facing the same way." So I looked up the dictionary in the meaning of adjective 'close'

    The meaning of 1.1 in the adjective close is "With very little or no space in between; dense.".

    I think this meaning means the word "apposed" in the sentence "The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment tightly apposed to the cementum."

    Is my opinion correct?

    • I want to have one more.

    Is the 'close' used in the meaning(close together and facing the same way.) of 'side by side' adjective?

    I'll be waiting for the reply.

  • Hi @AmosDuveen

    Thank you for your kind reply.

    By the way, my thoughts are a little different.

    The word "no space in between" in the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close means there is no space between objects. So does not that mean something is attached to something?
    At least I think it's clear that they are in touch with each other.

    Please read the new replies above and give us your feedback.

    Again, thank you very much.

  • SimoneSimone admin
    edited May 11

    Hi @drlee7779

    I agree with @AmosDuveen, and at the same time I think you are also correct in saying that 'apposed' means 'close' in your example sentence.

    "The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment tightly apposed to the cementum."

    'Apposed' tells us where the object (the portion of epithelium in question) is placed - near the cementum.
    It does not say it is necessarily touching or attached to it. We know _it attached is because the sentence clearly refers to the object in question as an 'epithelial _attachment'.

    Even if objects are touching each other, they are not necessarily attached: think about someone's teeth, they are very close and normally touching each other, but they are attached to the bone, not to each other.
    The same goes for 'close' meaning 'side-by-side' - it very often means that, but not necessarily.
    Think about sharks' teeth now. :)
    They have a few rows of teeth. Teeth from the same row will be side by side, but from different rows will not, albeit still being close to each other.

    I hope all this makes sense, my head is spinning a little bit now! :)

  • drlee7779drlee7779
    edited May 12

    Dear, @Simone

    Thank you for answer.

    The word 'apposed' used in the sentence "The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment." would be wrong expression.
    The expression "near the cementum." does not indicate that the lining epithelium is in contact with or attached to the cementum. It can only be expressed in a very close sense.

    Structually, the lining epithelium is attached tightly to the cementum by epithelial attahment.
    Therfore, the sentence(The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment tightly apposed to the cementum.) I asked must mean that the lining epithelium and cementum are tightly attached by the epithelial attahment.

    I thought apposed could be used as the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close, indicating that the lining epithelium is in contact with the cementum.
    However, if apposed can not indicate that the lining epithelium is in contact with the cementum, apposed is a wrong expression.

    Even if apposed indicates the 1.1 meaning of adjective close, is it not possible to indicate that the lining epithelium is attached or in contact with the cementum?

    Could you look over again?

    ** The meaning of 1.1 on 'side by side' is together.
    Can 'apposed' indicate this meaning? If so, does 'apposed' indicate that the lining epithelium is attached or in contact with the cementum?

  • Dear, @Simone

    There is one more question.

    What is the meaning of - (hyphen) in ['Apposed' tells us where the object of the epithelium in question is placed - near the cementum.]

  • joughtredjoughtred admin
    edited May 14

    Hi @drlee7779. I think the hyphen was perhaps supposed to be an em dash (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/dash-and-em-dash).

  • drlee7779drlee7779
    edited May 15

    Hi @joughtred

    Thank you for answer. I understood it well.

    When will I be able to get a reply from simone? I'm waiting.

    Please tell her that I'm sorry to have trouble her and thank you.

  • SimoneSimone admin

    @drlee7779 said:
    Dear, @Simone

    Thank you for answer.

    The word 'apposed' used in the sentence "The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment." would be wrong expression.
    The expression "near the cementum." does not indicate that the lining epithelium is in contact with or attached to the cementum. It can only be expressed in a very close sense.

    Structually, the lining epithelium is attached tightly to the cementum by epithelial attahment.
    Therfore, the sentence(The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment tightly apposed to the cementum.) I asked must mean that the lining epithelium and cementum are tightly attached by the epithelial attahment.

    I thought apposed could be used as the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close, indicating that the lining epithelium is in contact with the cementum.
    However, if apposed can not indicate that the lining epithelium is in contact with the cementum, apposed is a wrong expression.

    Even if apposed indicates the 1.1 meaning of adjective close, is it not possible to indicate that the lining epithelium is attached or in contact with the cementum?

    Could you look over again?

    ** The meaning of 1.1 on 'side by side' is together.
    Can 'apposed' indicate this meaning? If so, does 'apposed' indicate that the lining epithelium is attached or in contact with the cementum?

    Hi @drlee7779
    Apologies for the late reply, I was away.
    Oh, I think my comment was not very clear!
    I said 'apposed' doesn't necessarily mean attached, but this is not to say that it cannot mean attached, or in contact with.
    And the sentence makes it clear by describing the object in question as an attachment.
    So it seems to me that the word 'apposed' is used correctly in the sentence (but mind you, I have no technical knowledge of the subject area of the sentence!).
    I hope I understood your question correctly, and I hope I was able to answer it.

  • drlee7779drlee7779
    edited May 15

    Hi @Simone

    Thank you very sincerely for your kind help even though you are busy.

    I want to ask the last question.
    Please take one more look.

    The 1.1 meaning of the adjective close is "With very little or no space in between; dense.".

    The 1.1 meaning of the adjective close means that something is in close proximity or in contact with something.

    I think the expression "apposed to" in the sentence "The lining epithelium forms an epithelial attachment tightly apposed to the cementum" represents the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close.

    Is my opinion correct?

    Structurally, the lining epithelium is attached to the cementum surface by epithelial attachment. Thus, the 'apposed to' in the sentence should indicate that the epithelial attachment is attached to the surface of the cementum.

    If the 'apposed to' in the sentence indicates the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close, the 'apposed to' can mean that the epithelial attachment is attached to the surface of the cementum, but otherwise the apposed to is an incorrect expression.

    As you said, the term 'epithelial attachment' is used, so it can be deduced from the context. However, if 'apposed to' can not represent the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close, 'apposed to' is an inexact expression.

    I want you to help me.

  • SimoneSimone admin
    edited May 16

    @drlee7779

    As far as I understand, you are still asking the same question, so my comment remains the same:
    'apposed' doesn't necessarily mean attached, but this is not to say that it cannot mean attached.
    And because the rest of the sentence makes it clear, I wouldn't say that the use of the word 'apposed' is incorrect there.

    However, as I also mentioned before, I lack the technical knowledge of the subject in question, so this is all I can comment, and I can't be absolutely sure that I'm not wrong.
    Have you tried asking someone who has such technical knowledge for their opinion?

    Sorry I can't help more!

  • Hi @drlee7779,

    The word "no space in between" in the 1.1 meaning of the adjective close means there is no space between objects. So does not that mean something is attached to something?

    It's complex because context is the key here. Sense 1.1 of close relates to groupings or structure rather than the context you are questioning which is the relative position of two objects. What makes things more difficult is that synonyms are nearly never exact (why have two words that express exactly the same idea in the same way?) so if you have followed a chain of synonyms you must always be mindful of the risk that you are no longer considering the exact same meaning as described in the original text (as appears to have happened in your case).

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