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Which one is correct?

“It is ignored at the best of times and too dangerously polluted to be a site for any kind of activity.”

In this sentence, would it be incorrect to add ‘is’ before ‘too dangerously’? I feel that it’s unnecessary, and the sentence is fine as is, or should then be changed to “It is ignored at the best of times, and it is too dangerously polluted to be a site for any kind of activity.”

I’m so confused with coordinating conjunctions and phrases! Pls help!

Comments

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭
    edited June 29

    @Anm83

    The grammatical term is ELLIPSIS. It means missing out a word or group of words which can easily be 'understood'.

    In this sentence the words missed out are [it is]

    It is ignored at the best of times and [it is] too dangerously polluted to be a site for any kind of activity.

    it
    Without ELLIPSIS there are two clauses with the same SUBJECT
    It is ignored at the best of times
    it is too dangerously polluted to be a site for any kind of activity.

    is
    Without ELLIPSIS there are two clauses with the same word acting as
    1. the first word of the FINITE VERB FORM is ignored
    2. the only word of the FINITE VERB FORM is
    it Is ignored at the best of times
    it is is too dangerously polluted to be a site for any kind of activity.

    In the sentence as quoted both SUBJECT it and FINITE VERB FORM is are missed out.

    It wouldn't be 'incorrect' to miss out only the SUBJECT.
    It is ignored at the best of times and [it] is too dangerously polluted to be a site for any kind of activity.
    But it does sound strange.

    Other words could be missed out by ELLIPSIS

    ignored
    Some deny that it can be ignored, but it is [ignored] at the best of times.

    polluted
    How badly polluted is it?
    [It is] Too dangerously [polluted] to be a site for any king of activity.

    ELLIPSIS removes information — but that information is obvious.
    Indeed, if we leave the information in, it can make it a little harder for the hearer (or reader) to process the sentence as a whole.

    In this sentence, the ELLIPSIS of two words makes it easy to understand quickly.
    ELLIPSIS of only one word seems to make it a little bit harder to understand quickly.

    Note that it's not possible to keep it and miss out is.
    It would not be grammatical to say or write
    It is ignored at the best of times and it too dangerously polluted to be a site for any kind of activity.

    Although it's occasionally possible to miss out only the FINITE VERB FORM.
    John chose the blue and Jane [chose] the red
    This works because the clauses have different SUBJECTS and OBJECTS.

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