Why Future Continuous ?

**
"Sonia is usually at the gym between 6.30 and 7.30. There's no point phoning Sonia now. It's 7.00 and she will be working out at the gym.(work out)"**

I have this example from the exercise where I need to choose between Future Continuous or Future Perfect.
I understand it's not Perfect, and so I have to choose Future Continuous.
But I don't understand why.
Why is it not Present Continuous instead?
How does it change the meaning when I use Future Continuous ?

Thank you in advance

Dasha

Comments

  • DavidCrosbieDavidCrosbie ✭✭✭
    edited June 8

    Dasha, this is not Future!

    The English word will is classed not simply as a verb but as a MODAL VERB.

    MODAL VERBS

    • have a different grammar form verbs which are not AUXILIARIES
    • express attitudes or judgements
    • approximately reflect MODAL LOGIC in which the terms NECESSARY and POSSIBLE are used instead of TRUE and FALSE

    1
    One use of will is simply 'want to' or 'agree to'.
    In Present Day English we see this in
    Will you help me?
    If you will wait here, I'll see if he's free.

    2
    Sometimes we use stressed will with a stronger sense 'insist on'
    If you will play with fire, you must expect to get burnt.

    3
    In the past people use will in contrast to shall

    • shall — future happening over which the SUBJECT has no control
    • will — future happening over which the SUBJECT does have no control

    This distinction has almost completely disappeared in Present Day English. However:

    • Old-fashioned grammar books tell children to use shall not will when the SUBJECT is I or we
    • In conversation, when the SUBJECT is also the SPEAKER (or includes the SPEAKER), most dialects of English do distinguish these INTERROGATIVE sentences
      • Shall I go? — OFFER 'Do you want me to go?'
      • Shall we go? — SUGGESTION 'Do you want us to go?'
      • Will I/Will we we go? — QUESTION (asking for information/opinion) 'Do you you think that I/we will go?'

    4
    In its MODAL meaning will expresses JUDGEMENT that something is PROBABLE or NECESSARILY TRUE.

    • In POSITIVE sentences it contrasts with may

      • That will be John. (certainly or probably)
      • That may be John. (possibly)
    • in NEGATIVE CONTRAST it may contrast with can not/can't

      • That will be John. (certainly or probably)
      • That can't be John. (certainly not or probably not)

    It's important to remember that this use of will usually refers to PRESENT TIME
    That will be John now.
    People will be waking up in America now.

    To refer to PAST TIME we use will have
    That will have been John.
    The French will have been having a holiday yesterday.

    CONCLUSION
    So, your sentence expresses a LOGICAL JUDGEMENT.
    Because the PRESENT TIME (7 pm) is within the REGULAR PERIOD when Sonia is usually at the gym, we can calculate that Sonia is PROBABLY working out.

    We could have written
    Sonia is usually at the gym between 6.30 and 7.30. There was no point phoning Sonia then. It was 7.00 and she would have been working out at the gym.

    She will be working out at the gym. is a JUDGEMENT based on LOGIC
    She is working out at the gym. is a REPORT based on OBSERVATION or KNOWLEDGE.
    Both are PRESENT PROGRESSIVE — MODAL and NON-MODAL.

    RELATED MEANINGS
    We could express different JUDGEMENTS with different MODAL verbs
    Sonia is often at the gym between 6.30 and 7.30. It may not be a good idea to phone Sonia now. It's 7.00 and she may be working out at the gym.
    Sonia is never at the gym between 6.30 and 7.30. It may be a good idea to phone Sonia now. It's 7.00 and she can't be working out at the gym.
    Sonia is often at the gym between 6.30 and 7.30. I'm not surprised now to hear that she didn't answer her phone then. It was 7.00 and she will have been working out at the gym.
    Sonia is often at the gym between 6.30 and 7.30. It wasn't a good idea to phone Sonia then. It was 7.00 and she would have been working out at the gym.

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